Etymology
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pull-up (n.)

1837, "act of bringing a horse or vehicle to a sudden stop," from the verbal phrase; see pull (v.) + up (adv.). To pull up is attested by early 14c. as "lift (someone or something)," late 14c. as "uproot." By 1887 as "a place for pulling up a vehicle." The noun, as a type of horizontal bar physical exercise involving pulling up the body by means of the arms, is attested by 1891.

The sense of "check a course of action" is from 1808, figurative of the lifting of the reins in horse-riding; pull (v.) in the sense of "check or hold back one's horse to keep it from winning" is by 1800. 

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Definitions of pull-up

pull-up (n.)
a roadside cafe especially for lorry drivers;
Synonyms: pull-in
pull-up (n.)
an arm exercise performed by pulling yourself up on a horizontal bar until your chin is level with the bar;
Synonyms: chin-up
From wordnet.princeton.edu