Etymology
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provocative (adj.)

mid-15c., "eliciting," from Old French provocatif (15c.) and directly from Late Latin provocativus "calling forth," from provocat-, past-participle stem of Latin provocare (see provoke). Specifically "serving or tending to excite or stimulate sexual desire" from 1620s. Related: Provocatively; provocativeness. The earliest appearance of the word in English is as a noun meaning "an aphrodisiac" (early 15c.).

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Definitions of provocative

provocative (adj.)
serving or tending to provoke, excite, or stimulate; stimulating discussion or exciting controversy; "provocative Irish tunes which...compel the hearers to dance"- Anthony Trollope;
a provocative remark
a provocative smile
provocative (adj.)
intentionally arousing sexual desire;
her gestures and postures became more wanton and provocative
From wordnet.princeton.edu