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provection (n.)

1650s, "advancement" (a sense now obsolete); 1868 in the philological sense "carrying of the final letter of a word into the next one" (as in newt), from Late Latin provectionem (nominative provectio) "advancement," noun of action from past-participle stem provehere "to carry forward," from pro "toward, ahead" (see pro-) + vehere "to carry" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle"). Middle English had a verb provecten "to advance (someone), exalt" (mid-15c.), from Latin provectus, past participle of provehere.

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