Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to protection

pro- 

word-forming element meaning "forward, forth, toward the front" (as in proclaim, proceed); "beforehand, in advance" (prohibit, provide); "taking care of" (procure); "in place of, on behalf of" (proconsul, pronoun); from Latin pro (adv., prep.) "on behalf of, in place of, before, for, in exchange for, just as," which also was used as a first element in compounds and had a collateral form por-.

Also in some cases from cognate Greek pro "before, in front of, sooner," which also was used in Greek as a prefix (as in problem). Both the Latin and Greek words are from PIE *pro- (source also of Sanskrit pra- "before, forward, forth;" Gothic faura "before," Old English fore "before, for, on account of," fram "forward, from;" Old Irish roar "enough"), extended form of root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before, toward, near," etc.

The common modern sense of "in favor of, favoring" (pro-independence, pro-fluoridation, pro-Soviet, etc.) was not in classical Latin and is attested in English from early 19c.

Advertisement
*(s)teg- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to cover," especially with a roof. It forms all or part of: deck (n.) "covering over part of a ship;" deck (v.) "adorn;" deckle; detect; integument; protect; protection; stegosaurus; tegular; tegument; thatch; thug; tile; Tuileries.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sthag- "cover, conceal, hide;" Greek stegein "to cover," stegos "a roof;" Latin tegere "to cover," tegula "tile;" Lithuanian stėgti "to roof;" Old Norse þekja, Old English þeccan "thatch;" Dutch dekken, German decken "to cover, put under roof;" Irish tuigiur "cover," tech "house;" Welsh toi "thatch, roof," ty "house."

overprotection (n.)

also over-protection, 1929, originally in reference to children, "act or condition of protecting to an undue or unhealthy extent," from over- + protection.

protectionist (n.)

in the economics sense of "one who favors protection of native industry or some branch of it from foreign competition by means of tariffs, etc.," 1841, from French protectionniste (in political economy sense, protection in English is attested from 1789). As an adjective by 1843.

protector (n.)

late 14c., protectour, "a defender, guardian, one who defends or shields from injury or evil," from Old French protector (14c., Modern French protecteur) and directly from Late Latin protector, agent noun from protegere (see protection). Related: Protectoral; protectorial; protectorian. Fem. forms protectrix, protectryse both attested from mid-15c. Protectee is attested from c. 1600.

In English history, "one who has care of the kingdom during the king's minority or incapacity, a regent" (as the Duke of Somerset during the reign of Edward VI); Lord Protector was the title of the head of the executive during part of the period of the Commonwealth, held by Oliver Cromwell (1653-58) and Richard Cromwell (1658-59).

protege (n.)

"one who is under the care or protection of another," 1778, from French protégé (fem. protégée) "one who is protected," noun use of past participle of protéger "protect," from Latin protegere (see protect; also see protection). Usually in italics in English before 1820s.