Advertisement

proposition (n.)

mid-14c., proposicioun, "a riddle" (a sense now obsolete); late 14c., in rhetoric, "a setting forth as a topic for discussion or discourse," from Old French proposicion "proposal, submission, (philosophical) proposition" (12c.), from Latin propositionem (nominative propositio) "a setting forth, statement, a presentation, representation; fundamental assumption," noun of action from past-participle stem of proponere "put forth, set forth, lay out, display, expose to view" (see propound). Meaning "action of proposing something to be done, an offered plan of action," is from late 14c. General sense of "matter, problem, undertaking" recorded by 1877. Related: Propositional; propositionally.

proposition (v.)

"make or present a proposition," 1914, from proposition (n.). The older verb is propose. Specifically of sexual favors by 1936. Related: Propositioned; propositioning.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Definitions of proposition from WordNet
1
proposition (n.)
(logic) a statement that affirms or denies something and is either true or false;
proposition (n.)
a proposal offered for acceptance or rejection;
Synonyms: suggestion / proffer
proposition (n.)
an offer for a private bargain (especially a request for sexual favors);
proposition (n.)
the act of making a proposal;
Synonyms: proposal
proposition (n.)
a task to be dealt with;
securing adequate funding is a time-consuming proposition
2
proposition (v.)
suggest sex to;
She was propositioned by a stranger at the party
From wordnet.princeton.edu