Etymology
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Words related to prophylactic

pro- 

word-forming element meaning "forward, forth, toward the front" (as in proclaim, proceed); "beforehand, in advance" (prohibit, provide); "taking care of" (procure); "in place of, on behalf of" (proconsul, pronoun); from Latin pro (adv., prep.) "on behalf of, in place of, before, for, in exchange for, just as," which also was used as a first element in compounds and had a collateral form por-.

Also in some cases from cognate Greek pro "before, in front of, sooner," which also was used in Greek as a prefix (as in problem). Both the Latin and Greek words are from PIE *pro- (source also of Sanskrit pra- "before, forward, forth;" Gothic faura "before," Old English fore "before, for, on account of," fram "forward, from;" Old Irish roar "enough"), extended form of root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before, toward, near," etc.

The common modern sense of "in favor of, favoring" (pro-independence, pro-fluoridation, pro-Soviet, etc.) was not in classical Latin and is attested in English from early 19c.

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anaphylactic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a severe allergic reaction," 1905, with -ic + medical Latin noun anaphylaxis "exaggerated susceptibility," from Greek ana- "up" (see ana-) + phylaxis "protection," from phylax "guardian, watcher, protector," a word of unknown origin. Compare prophylactic. Anaphylactic shock is attested by 1916.

condom (n.)

"contraceptive sheath," 1706, traditionally named for a British physician during reign of Charles II (a story traceable to 1709), but there is no evidence for that. Also spelled condam, quondam, which suggests it may be from Italian guantone, from guanto "a glove." A word omitted in the original OED (c. 1890) and not used openly in the U.S. and not advertised in mass media until the November 1986 speech by Surgeon General C. Everett Koop on AIDS prevention. Compare prophylactic.

prophylaxis (n.)

"preventive treatment of disease, a guarding against the attack of some disease," 1746, Modern Latin, from Greek prophylassein "to keep guard before," from pro "before" (see pro-) + phylassein "to watch over, guard" (see prophylactic).