Etymology
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prodigious (adj.)

1550s, "ominous, portentous" (a sense now obsolete), from French prodigieux and directly from Latin prodigiosus "strange, wonderful, marvelous, unnatural," from prodigium "an omen, portent, monster" (see prodigy).

From 1560s as "causing wonder or amazement;" 1570s as "unnatural, abnormal." The meaning "vast, enormous, wonderfully large" is from c. 1600. As a pseudo-adverb, "exceedingly," by 1670s. Related: Prodigiously; prodigiousness; prodigiosity.

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Definitions of prodigious

prodigious (adj.)
so great in size or force or extent as to elicit awe;
a prodigious storm
Synonyms: colossal / stupendous
prodigious (adj.)
of momentous or ominous significance; "such a portentous...monster raised all my curiosity"- Herman Melville;
a prodigious vision
Synonyms: portentous
prodigious (adj.)
far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree;
the young Mozart's prodigious talents
Synonyms: exceeding / exceptional / olympian / surpassing
From wordnet.princeton.edu