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price (n.)

c. 1200, pris "value, worth; praise," later "cost, recompense, prize" (mid-13c.), from Old French pris "price, value, wages, reward," also "honor, fame, praise, prize" (Modern French prix), from Late Latin precium, from Latin pretium "reward, prize, value, worth," from PIE *pret-yo-, suffixed form of *pret-, extended form of root *per- (5) "to traffic in, to sell."

Praise, price, and prize began to diverge in Old French, with praise emerging in Middle English by early 14c. and prize being evident by late 1500s with the rise of the -z- spelling. Having shed the extra Old French and Middle English senses, the word now again has the base sense of the Latin original. To set (or put) a price on someone, "offer a reward for capture" is from 1766.

price (v.)

"to set the price of," late 14c., from price (n.) or from Old French prisier, variant of preisier "to value, estimate; to praise." Related: Priced; pricing.

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Definitions of price from WordNet
1
price (n.)
the property of having material worth (often indicated by the amount of money something would bring if sold);
he puts a high price on his services
Synonyms: monetary value / cost
price (n.)
the amount of money needed to purchase something;
the price of gasoline
Synonyms: terms / damage
price (n.)
value measured by what must be given or done or undergone to obtain something;
the price of success is hard work
what price glory?
Synonyms: cost / toll
price (n.)
the high value or worth of something;
her price is far above rubies
price (n.)
a monetary reward for helping to catch a criminal;
the cattle thief has a price on his head
price (n.)
cost of bribing someone;
they say that every politician has a price
2
price (v.)
determine the price of;
The grocer priced his wares high
price (v.)
ascertain or learn the price of;
Have you priced personal computers lately?
3
Price (n.)
United States operatic soprano (born 1927);
Synonyms: Leontyne Price / Mary Leontyne Price
From wordnet.princeton.edu