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presage (n.)

late 14c., "something which portends or foreshadows," from Latin praesagium "a foreboding," from praesagire "to perceive beforehand, forebode," from praesagus (adj.) "perceiving beforehand, prophetic," from prae "before" (see pre-) + sagus "prophetic," related to sagire "perceive" (see sagacious).

presage (v.)

1560s, "foreshadow, foretoken, signify beforehand;" 1590s, "have a presentiment," from French présager (16c.), from présage "omen," from Latin praesagium "a presage," from praesagire "to perceive beforehand," from praesagus (adj.) "perceiving beforehand, prophetic," from prae "before" (see pre-) + sagus "prophetic," related to sagire "perceive" (see sagacious). Related: Presaged; presaging.

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Definitions of presage
1
presage (n.)
a foreboding about what is about to happen;
presage (n.)
a sign of something about to happen;
2
presage (v.)
indicate, as with a sign or an omen;
From wordnet.princeton.edu