Etymology
Advertisement

premise (n.)

late 14c., in logic, "a previous proposition from which another follows, a judgment causing another judgment," from Old French premisse (14c.), from Medieval Latin praemissa (propositio or sententia) "(the proposition) set before," noun use of fem. past participle of Latin praemittere "send forward, put before," from prae "before" (see pre-) + mittere "to send" (see mission).

In legal documents it meant "matter previously stated" (early 15c.), which in deeds or wills often was a description of a house or building, hence the extended meaning "house or building, with grounds" (1730).

premise (v.)

"to state before something else, set forth or make known as introductory to the main subject," mid-15c., from premise (n.). Related: Premised; premising.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of premise
1
premise (v.)
set forth beforehand, often as an explanation;
He premised these remarks so that his readers might understand
premise (v.)
furnish with a preface or introduction;
Synonyms: precede / preface / introduce
premise (v.)
take something as preexisting and given;
Synonyms: premiss
2
premise (n.)
a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn;
Synonyms: premiss / assumption
From wordnet.princeton.edu