Etymology
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predicament (n.)

early 15c., in philosophy, "category, class; one of Aristotle's 10 categories," from Medieval Latin predicamentum, from Late Latin praedicamentum "quality, category, something predicted, that which is asserted," from Latin praedicatus, past participle of praedicare "assert, proclaim, declare publicly," from prae- "forth, before" (see pre-) + dicare "proclaim" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly," and see diction). Praedicamentum is a loan-translation of Greek kategoria, Aristotle's word.

The meaning "unpleasant, dangerous, or trying situation" is a particular negative use of the general sense of "a state of being, condition, situation" (1580s).

updated on October 20, 2020

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Definitions of predicament from WordNet

predicament (n.)
a situation from which extrication is difficult especially an unpleasant or trying one;
finds himself in a most awkward predicament
Synonyms: quandary / plight
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.