Etymology
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pouch (n.)

early 14c. (late 12c. as a surname), pouche, "bag worn on one's person for carrying things," especially (late 14c.) "small bag in which money is carried," from Anglo-French puche, Old North French pouche (13c.), Old French poche "purse, poke," all from a Germanic source (compare Old English pocca "bag;" see poke (n.1)). Extended to sac-like cavities in animal bodies from c. 1400.

pouch (v.)

1560s, "put in a pouch;" 1670s, "to form a pouch, swell or protrude," from pouch (n.). Related: Pouched; pouching.

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Definitions of pouch
1
pouch (v.)
put into a small bag;
pouch (v.)
send by special mail that goes through diplomatic channels;
pouch (v.)
swell or protrude outwards;
Synonyms: bulge / protrude
2
pouch (n.)
a small or medium size container for holding or carrying things;
pouch (n.)
an enclosed space;
Synonyms: sac / sack / pocket
pouch (n.)
(anatomy) saclike structure in any of various animals (as a marsupial or gopher or pelican);
Synonyms: pocket
From wordnet.princeton.edu