Etymology
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posture (n.)

c. 1600, "position, situation; disposition of the several parts of anything with respect to one another or a particular purpose," especially of the body, "pose," from French posture (16c.), from Italian postura "position, posture," from Latin positura "position, station," from postulus from past participle stem of ponere "to put, place" (see position (n.)). The figurative sense of "a state of being or attitude in relation to circumstances" is from 1640s. Related: Postural.

posture (v.)

1620s, transitive, "to place, set," from posture (n.). Intransitive sense of "assume a particular posture of the body, dispose the body in a particular attitude" is by 1851 (at first in reference to contortionists). The figurative sense of "take up an artificial position of the mind or character" (hence "display affectation") is attested by 1877. Related: Postured; posturing.

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Definitions of posture
1
posture (n.)
the arrangement of the body and its limbs;
Synonyms: position / attitude
posture (n.)
characteristic way of bearing one's body;
stood with good posture
Synonyms: carriage / bearing
posture (n.)
a rationalized mental attitude;
Synonyms: position / stance
posture (n.)
capability in terms of personnel and materiel that affect the capacity to fight a war;
politicians have neglected our military posture
Synonyms: military capability / military strength / strength / military posture
2
posture (v.)
behave affectedly or unnaturally in order to impress others;
She postured and made a total fool of herself
Synonyms: pose
posture (v.)
assume a posture as for artistic purposes;
Synonyms: model / pose / sit
From wordnet.princeton.edu