Etymology
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plover (n.)

c. 1300, "migratory shore-bird of the Old World," from Anglo-French plover, Old French pluvier, earlier plovier (c. 1200), from Vulgar Latin *plovarius, literally "belonging to rain," from Latin pluvia "rain (water)" from pluere "to rain" (from PIE root *pleu- "to flow"). Perhaps it was so called because the birds' migration arrival in Western Europe (it breeds in summer in the Arctic) coincides with the start of the rainy season, or from its supposed restlessness when rain approaches. The name was later extended to related or similar American species.

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Definitions of plover

plover (n.)
any of numerous chiefly shorebirds of relatively compact build having straight bills and large pointed wings; closely related to the sandpipers;
From wordnet.princeton.edu