Etymology
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Words related to plot

plat (n.)

"flat piece of ground," mid-15c. (mid-13c. in surnames), a variant of plot (n.) assimilated to Middle English plat (adj.) "flat," which is from Old French plat "flat, stretched out" (see plateau (n.)). See OED plat sb.3 for full explanation.

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plan (n.)

1670s as a technical term in perspective drawing; more generally by 1706 as "the representation of anything drawn on a plane; a drawing, sketch, or diagram of any object," from French plan "ground plot of a building, map," literally "plane surface" (mid-16c.), from Latin planum "level or flat surface," noun use of adjective planus "level, flat" (from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread").

The notion is of "a drawing on a flat surface." A doublet of plain via a later, learned French form. The meaning "scheme of action, formulated scheme for the accomplishment of some object or attainment of an end" is by 1713.

marplot (n.)

"one who by officious interference defeats a design," 1708, the name of a character in Susanna Centlivre's comedy "The busie body;" from mar (v.) + plot (n.).

subplot (n.)
also sub-plot, 1812 in literature, from sub- + plot (n.).