Etymology
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plenary (adj.)

early 15c., plenarie, "full, complete," earlier plenar (mid-13c.), from Old French plenier and directly from Medieval Latin plenarius "entire, complete," from Latin plenus "full, filled, greatly crowded; stout, pregnant; abundant, abounding; complete," from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill." Of an assembly, "fully attended," 1530s. Meaning "having full power" is from 1861. Related: Plenarily.

updated on July 10, 2020

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Definitions of plenary from WordNet

plenary (adj.)
full in all respects;
a diplomat with plenary powers
a plenary session of the legislature
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.