Etymology
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Words related to please

like (v.)
Old English lician "to please, be pleasing, be sufficient," from Proto-Germanic *likjan (source also of Old Norse lika, Old Saxon likon, Old Frisian likia, Dutch lijken "to suit," Old High German lihhen, Gothic leikan "to please"), from *lik- "body, form; like, same."

The sense development is unclear; perhaps "to be like" (see like (adj.)), thus, "to be suitable." Like (and dislike) originally were impersonal and the liking flowed the other way: "The music likes you not" ["The Two Gentlemen of Verona"]. The modern flow began to appear late 14c. (compare please). Related: Liked; liking.
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complacence (n.)

mid-15c., "pleasure, gratification," especially "self-satisfaction, delight in one's condition" (c. 1500), from Medieval Latin complacentia "satisfaction, pleasure," from Latin complacentem (nominative complacens), present participle of complacere "to be very pleasing," from com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + placere "to please" (see please (v.)). The sense of "disposition to please" (1620s) now goes with complaisance.

displease (v.)

late 14c., displesen, "fail to please, be disagreeable to," from Old French desplais-, present-tense stem of desplaisir "to displease" (13c., Modern French déplaire), from Latin displicere "displease," from dis- "not" (see dis-) + placere "to please" (see please (v.)). Related: Displeased; displeasing.

placable (adj.)

c. 1500, "pleasing, agreeable" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French placable "forgiving, conciliatory" and directly from Latin placabilis "easily appeased or pacified," from placare "to calm, appease, quiet, soothe, assuage," causative of placere "to please" (see please). From 1580s as "capable of being pleased or pacified, easily appeased, willing to forgive." Related: Placably; placability.

placate (v.)

"appease or pacify," 1670s, a back-formation from placation or else from Latin placatus "soothed, quiet, gentle, calm, peaceful," past participle of placare "to calm, appease, quiet, soothe, assuage," causative of placere "to please" (see please). Related: Placated; placating; placatingly.

placation (n.)

"act of pleasing, pacifying, or conciliating," 1580s, from French placation (16c.), from Latin placationem (nominative placatio) "an appeasing, pacifying, quieting," noun of action from past-participle stem of placare "to calm, appease, quiet, soothe, assuage," causative of placere "to please" (see please).

placatory (adj.)

"conciliatory, intended to placate or appease," 1630s, from Latin placatorius "pertaining to appeasing," from placat-, past-participle stem of placare "to calm, appease, quiet, soothe, assuage," causative of placere "to please" (see please).

placebo (n.)

early 13c., name given to the rite of Vespers of the Office of the Dead, so called from the opening of the first antiphon, "I will please the Lord in the land of the living" (Psalms cxvi.9, in Vulgate Placebo Domino in regione vivorum), from Latin placebo "I shall please," future indicative of placere "to please" (see please).

Medical sense is recorded by 1785, "a medicine given more to please than to benefit the patient." Placebo effect is attested from 1900.

placid (adj.)

"gentle, quiet, undisturbed, serene, calm," 1620s, from French placide (15c.) and directly from Latin placidus "pleasing, peaceful, quiet, gentle, still, calm," from placere "to please" (see please). Related: Placidly; placidness.

plea (n.)

early 13c., ple, "lawsuit, legal conflict," also "strife, contention, complaint," from Anglo-French plai (late 12c.), Old French plait "lawsuit, decision, decree" (9c.), from Medieval Latin placitum, plactum "lawsuit," in classical Latin, "opinion, decree," literally "that which pleases, thing which is agreed upon," properly neuter past participle of placere "to please, give pleasure, be approved" (see please).

The sense development seems to have been from "something pleasant," to "something that pleases both sides," to "something that has been decided." Meaning "an entreaty, a pleading, an argument in a suit" is attested from late 14c. Plea-bargaining is attested by 1963. Common pleas (early 13c.) originally were legal proceedings over which the Crown did not claim exclusive jurisdiction (as distinct from pleas of the Crown "public prosecution in criminal cases"); later "actions brought by one subject against another."