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plank (n.)

late 13c. (c. 1200 as a surname), from Old North French planke, variant of Old French planche "plank, slab, little wooden bridge" (12c.), from Late Latin planca "broad slab, board," probably from Latin plancus "flat, flat-footed," from a nasalized variant of PIE root *plak- (1) "to be flat." Technically, timber sawed to measure 2 to 6 inches thick, 9 inches or more wide, and 8 feet or more long. Political sense of "item of a party platform" is U.S. coinage from 1848. To walk the plank, supposedly a pirate punishment, is first attested 1789 and most early references are to slave-traders disposing of excess human cargo in crossing the ocean.

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Definitions of plank from WordNet
1
plank (v.)
cover with planks;
The streets were planked
Synonyms: plank over
plank (v.)
set (something or oneself) down with or as if with a noise;
He planked himself into the sofa
He planked the money on the table
Synonyms: flump / plonk / plop / plunk / plump down / plunk down / plump
plank (v.)
cook and serve on a plank;
2
plank (n.)
a stout length of sawn timber; made in a wide variety of sizes and used for many purposes;
Synonyms: board
plank (n.)
an endorsed policy in the platform of a political party;
From wordnet.princeton.edu