Etymology
Advertisement

plaint (n.)

c. 1200, pleinte, "lamentation, mourning, audible expression of sorrow," from Old French plainte "lament, lamentation" (12c.), from Latin planctus "lamentation, wailing, beating of the breast," from past-participle stem of plangere "to lament; to strike (the breast, in grief or mourning)," from PIE root *plak- (2) "to strike." The connecting notion in Latin probably is beating one's breast in grief. Meaning "complaint, murmuring, grumbling" is from late 14c. Sense of "lawsuit, legal complaint, statement of grievances made to a court for the purpose of asking redress" is from late 14c.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of plaint

plaint (n.)
(United Kingdom) a written statement of the grounds of complaint made to court of law asking for the grievance to be redressed;
plaint (n.)
a cry of sorrow and grief;
Synonyms: lament / lamentation / wail
From wordnet.princeton.edu