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plague (n.)

late 14c., plage, "affliction, calamity, evil, scourge, severe trouble or vexation;" early 15c., "malignant disease," from Old French plage (14c., Modern French plaie), from Late Latin plaga "affliction; slaughter, destruction," used in Vulgate for "pestilence," from Latin plaga "stroke, wound," probably from root of plangere "to strike, lament (by beating the breast)," from or cognate with Greek (Doric) plaga "blow" (from PIE root *plak- (2) "to strike").

Sometimes in Middle English also "a strike, a blow" (late 14c.). The Latin word also is the source of Old Irish plag (genitive plaige) "plague, pestilence," German Plage, Dutch plaage. Meaning "epidemic that causes many deaths" is from 1540s; specifically in reference to bubonic plague from c. 1600. Modern spelling follows French, which had plague from 15c. Weakened sense of "anything annoying" is from c. 1600.

plague (v.)

late 15c. (Caxton), "infest with disease or other natural calamity," from Middle Dutch plaghen, from plaghe (n.) "plague" (see plague (n.)). The sense of "vex, harass, bother, annoy" is recorded from 1590s. Related: Plagued; plaguing.

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Definitions of plague
1
plague (n.)
a serious (sometimes fatal) infection of rodents caused by Yersinia pestis and accidentally transmitted to humans by the bite of a flea that has bitten an infected animal;
Synonyms: pestilence / pest / pestis
plague (n.)
any epidemic disease with a high death rate;
Synonyms: pestilence / pest
plague (n.)
a swarm of insects that attack plants;
a plague of grasshoppers
Synonyms: infestation
plague (n.)
any large scale calamity (especially when thought to be sent by God);
plague (n.)
an annoyance;
those children are a damn plague
2
plague (v.)
cause to suffer a blight;
Synonyms: blight
plague (v.)
annoy continually or chronically;
Synonyms: harass / hassle / harry / chivy / chivvy / chevy / chevvy / beset / molest / provoke
From wordnet.princeton.edu