Etymology
Advertisement

pierce (v.)

c. 1300 (c. 1200 as a surname), percen, "make a hole in; force one's way through; thrust through with or as with a sharp or pointed instrument," from Anglo-French perser, Old French percier "pierce, transfix, drive through" (12c., Modern French percer), probably from Vulgar Latin *pertusiare, frequentative of Latin pertusus, past participle of pertundere "to thrust or bore through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + tundere "to beat, pound," from PIE *tund-, from root *(s)teu- "to push, strike, knock, beat, thrust" (see obtuse). Related: Pierced; piercing.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of pierce
1
pierce (v.)
cut or make a way through;
The path pierced the jungle
Light pierced through the forest
pierce (v.)
move or affect (a person's emotions or bodily feelings) deeply or sharply;
The cold pierced her bones
Her words pierced the students
pierce (v.)
sound sharply or shrilly;
The scream pierced the night
pierce (v.)
penetrate or cut through with a sharp instrument;
Synonyms: thrust
pierce (v.)
make a hole into;
The needle pierced her flesh
2
Pierce (n.)
14th President of the United States (1804-1869);
Synonyms: Franklin Pierce / President Pierce
From wordnet.princeton.edu