Etymology
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piece (n.1)

c. 1200, pece, "fixed amount, measure, portion;" c. 1300, "fragment of an object, bit of a whole, slice of meat; separate fragment, section, or part," from Old French piece "piece, bit portion; item; coin" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *pettia, probably from Gaulish *pettsi (compare Welsh peth "thing," Breton pez "piece, a little"), perhaps from an Old Celtic base *kwezd-i-, from PIE root *kwezd- "a part, piece" (source also of Russian chast' "part"). Related: Pieces.

Meaning "separate article forming part of a class or group" is from c. 1400; that of "specimen, instance, example" is from 1560s. Sense of "portable firearm" is from 1580s, earlier "artillery weapon" (1540s). The meaning "chessman" is from 1560s. Meaning "a period of time" is from early 14c.; that of "a portion of a distance" is from 1610s; that of "literary composition" dates from 1530s.

Piece of (one's) mind "one's opinion expressed bluntly" is from 1570s. Piece of work "remarkable person" echoes Hamlet. Piece as "a coin" is attested in English from c. 1400, hence piece of eight, old name for the Spanish dollar (c. 1600) of the value of 8 reals and bearing a numeral 8. Adverbial phrase in one piece "whole, undivided, without loss or injury" is by 1580s; of a piece "as of the same piece or whole" is from 1610s.

piece (v.)

c. 1400, pecen, "to mend (clothing) by adding pieces," from piece (n.1). Sense of "to join, unite or reunite, put together again" is from late 15c. Related: Pieced; piecing.

piece (n.2)

"a person, an individual," c. 1300, from piece (n.1), but in modern use contemptuous and commonly of women; the meaning "person regarded as a sex object" is by 1785. Compare piece of ass under ass (n.2); human beings colloquially have been piece of flesh from 1590s; also compare Latin scortum "bimbo, anyone available for a price," literally "skin."

PIECE. A wench. A damned good or bad piece; a girl who is more or less active and skilful in the amorous congress. Hence the (Cambridge) toast, may we never have a PIECE (peace) that will injure the constitution. [Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit and Pickpocket Eloquence, London, 1811] 

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Definitions of piece
1
piece (n.)
a separate part of a whole;
an important piece of the evidence
piece (n.)
an item that is an instance of some type;
he designed a new piece of equipment
she bought a lovely piece of china
Synonyms: part
piece (n.)
a portion of a natural object;
he needed a piece of granite
Synonyms: part
piece (n.)
a musical work that has been created;
Synonyms: musical composition / opus / composition / piece of music
piece (n.)
an instance of some kind;
it was a nice piece of work
Synonyms: bit
piece (n.)
an artistic or literary composition;
he wrote an interesting piece on Iran
the children acted out a comic piece to amuse the guests
piece (n.)
a portable gun;
Synonyms: firearm / small-arm
piece (n.)
a serving that has been cut from a larger portion;
a piece of pie
Synonyms: slice
piece (n.)
a distance;
it is down the road a piece
piece (n.)
a work of art of some artistic value;
it is not known who created this piece
Synonyms: objet d'art / art object
piece (n.)
a period of indeterminate length (usually short) marked by some action or condition;
I need to rest for a piece
Synonyms: while / spell / patch
piece (n.)
a share of something;
Synonyms: slice
piece (n.)
game equipment consisting of an object used in playing certain board games;
he sacrificed a piece to get a strategic advantage
Synonyms: man
2
piece (v.)
to join or unite the pieces of;
Synonyms: patch
piece (v.)
create by putting components or members together;
She pieced a quilt
Synonyms: assemble / put together / set up / tack / tack together
piece (v.)
join during spinning;
piece the broken pieces of thread, slivers, and rovings
piece (v.)
eat intermittently; take small bites of;
He pieced at the sandwich all morning
Synonyms: nibble / pick
piece (v.)
repair by adding pieces;
She pieced the china cup
Synonyms: patch
From wordnet.princeton.edu