Etymology
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phrase (n.)

1520s, "manner or style of expression," also "brief expression with some unity; two or more words expressing what is practically a single notion," from Late Latin phrasis "diction," from Greek phrasis "speech, way of speaking, enunciation, phraseology," from phrazein "to tell, declare, indicate, point out, show, inform," also passively (phrazomai), "indicate to oneself, think or muse upon, consider; think up, contrive; suppose, believe, imagine; perceive, observe."

The Greek verb is of uncertain origin; perhaps it is connected with phrenes "wits, senses, sanity," phrēn "the mind, the heart," literally "midriff, diaphragm" (see phreno-). The musical sense of "a short and somewhat independent passage from a piece" is from 1789. Phrase-book "collection of expressions peculiar to a language" is by 1590s.

phrase (v.)

"to put into a phrase, express by a particular phrase," 1560s; see phrase (n.). Related: Phrased; phrasing.

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Definitions of phrase
1
phrase (n.)
an expression consisting of one or more words forming a grammatical constituent of a sentence;
phrase (n.)
a short musical passage;
Synonyms: musical phrase
phrase (n.)
an expression whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make it up;
Synonyms: idiom / idiomatic expression / phrasal idiom / set phrase
phrase (n.)
dance movements that are linked in a single choreographic sequence;
2
phrase (v.)
put into words or an expression;
Synonyms: give voice / formulate / word / articulate
phrase (v.)
divide, combine, or mark into phrases;
phrase a musical passage
From wordnet.princeton.edu