Etymology
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Words related to phobia

aerophobia (n.)
"morbid dread of a current of air," 1785; see aero- + phobia.
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Deimos 

satellite of Mars, discovered in 1877, named for Greek deimos, literally "fear, terror," also, as Deimos, the personification of such, regarded as a son of Ares, twin brother of Phobos"fear, panic, flight" (for which see phobia). Greek deimos is from PIE *duei- "fear," source also of Sanskrit dvesti "hate," Avestan duuaetha "threat," and possibly Latin dirus "fearful."

hydrophobia (n.)

late 14c., idroforbia, "dread of water, aversion to swallowing water," a symptom of rabies in man (sometimes used for the disease itself), from Late Latin hydrophobia, from Greek hydrophobos "dreading water," from hydr-, stem of hydor "water" (from suffixed form of PIE root *wed- (1) "water; wet") + phobos "dread, fear" (see phobia). So called because human sufferers show aversion to water and have difficulty swallowing it. In Old English as wæterfyrhtness. Related: Hydrophobe.

The term hydrophobia, which has been so generally applied to the Lyssa canina, has been deservedly reprobated, because the "dread of water," the literal meaning of the word, is not a pathognomonic mark of the disease. The older writers used the terms aerophobia, or a "dread of air," and pantophobia, or a "fear of all things," as appropriate names for the disease, because the impression cold air sometimes excites terror, and the disorder is marked, by a singular degree of general timidity and distrust. ["Encyclopaedia Londinensis," 1823]
-phobe 

word-forming element meaning "one who dreads, fears, or hates," from French -phobe, from Latin -phobus, from Greek -phobos "fearing," from phobos "fear, panic, flight," phobein "put to flight, frighten" (see phobia).

-phobia 

word-forming element meaning "excessive or irrational fear, horror, or aversion," from Latin -phobia and directly from Greek -phobia "panic fear of," from phobos "fear" (see phobia). In widespread popular use with native words from c. 1800. In psychology, "an abnormal or irrational fear." Related: -phobic.

phobic (adj.)

"pertaining to or characterized by phobia," 1888, from phobia + -ic. As a noun, "a person who has a phobia," from 1968. The Greek adjective was phobetikos "liable to fear."

phobophobia (n.)
"morbid dread of being alarmed," 1890; see phobia.