Etymology
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Words related to phalanx

balk (n.)

also baulk, Old English balca "ridge, bank," from or influenced by Old Norse balkr "ridge of land," especially between two plowed furrows, both from Proto-Germanic *balkon- (source also of Old Saxon balko, Danish bjelke, Old Frisian balka, Old High German balcho, German Balken "beam, rafter"), from PIE root *bhelg- "beam, plank" (source also of Latin fulcire "to prop up, support," fulcrum "bedpost;" Lithuanian balžiena "cross-bar;" and possibly Greek phalanx "trunk, log, line of battle"). Italian balco "a beam" is from Germanic (see balcony).

In old use especially "an unplowed strip in a field, often along and marking a boundary." Modern senses are figurative, representing the balk as a hindrance or obstruction (see balk (v.)). In baseball, "a motion made by the pitcher as if to deliver the ball, but without doing so," first attested 1845 perhaps from the notion of "a piece missed in plowing" as "a blunder, a failure."

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Falangist (n.)
1937, member of the Falange, the fascist party in Spain (founded 1933), from Spanish Falange (Española) "(Spanish) Phalanx," from Latin phalanx (genitive phalangis); see phalanx.
phalange (n.)

mid-15c., "phalanx, ancient military division," from Old French phalange "phalanx" (13c.) and directly from Latin phalangem (nominative phalanx); see phalanx. It is the earlier form of that word in English. Related: Phalangeal; phalangic.

phalanstery (n.)

1846 (in French form from 1844), "building or buildings occupied by a community living together and having goods and property in common," from French phalanstère, the name for one of the socialistic communities of 1,800 or so people, living together as family, proposed as the basic unit of society in the system of French social scientist François-Marie-Charles Fourier (1772-1837), coined by Fourier from phalange, properly "phalanx" (see phalanx) + ending after monastère "monastery." Transferred use, in reference to the groups themselves, is by 1850. Related: Phalansterial; phalansterian.