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pepper (n.)

"dried berries of the pepper plant," Middle English peper, from Old English pipor, from an early West Germanic borrowing of Latin piper "pepper," from Greek piperi, probably (via Persian) from Middle Indic pippari, from Sanskrit pippali "long pepper." The Latin word is the source of German Pfeffer, Italian pepe, French poivre, Old Church Slavonic pipru, Lithuanian pipiras, Old Irish piobhar, Welsh pybyr, etc.

Application to fruits of the Capsicum family (unrelated, originally native of tropical America) is from 16c. To have pepper in the nose in Middle English was "to be supercilious or unapproachable."

pepper (v.)

"to sprinkle as with pepper," 1610s, from pepper (n.). Old English had gepipera. Meaning "to pelt with shot, etc.; hit with what pains or annoys" is from 1640s. Related: Peppered; peppering.

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Definitions of pepper from WordNet
1
pepper (n.)
climber having dark red berries (peppercorns) when fully ripe; southern India and Sri Lanka; naturalized in northern Burma and Assam;
Synonyms: common pepper / black pepper / white pepper / Madagascar pepper / Piper nigrum
pepper (n.)
any of various tropical plants of the genus Capsicum bearing peppers;
Synonyms: capsicum / capsicum pepper plant
pepper (n.)
pungent seasoning from the berry of the common pepper plant of East India; use whole or ground;
Synonyms: peppercorn
pepper (n.)
sweet and hot varieties of fruits of plants of the genus Capsicum;
2
pepper (v.)
add pepper to;
pepper the soup
pepper (v.)
attack and bombard with or as if with missiles;
Synonyms: pelt
From wordnet.princeton.edu