Etymology
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peer (n.)

c. 1300, "an equal in rank, character, or status" (early 13c. in Anglo-Latin), from Anglo-French peir, Old French per (10c.), from Latin par "equal" (see par (n.)). Sense of "a nobleman of especial dignity" (late 14c.) is from Charlemagne's Twelve Peers in the old romances, who, like the Arthurian knights of the Round Table, originally were so called because all were equal. Sociological sense of "one of the same age group or social set" is from 1944. Peer review "evaluation of a scientific project by experts in the relevant field" is attested by 1970. Peer pressure is recorded by 1971.

peer (v.)

"to look closely," 1590s, variant of piren (late 14c.), with a long -i-, probably related to or from East Frisian piren "to look," of uncertain origin. Influenced in form and sense by Middle English peren (late 14c.), shortened form of aperen (see appear). Related: Peered; peering.

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Definitions of peer
1
peer (n.)
a person who is of equal standing with another in a group;
Synonyms: equal / match / compeer
peer (n.)
a nobleman (duke or marquis or earl or viscount or baron) who is a member of the British peerage;
2
peer (v.)
look searchingly;
We peered into the back of the shop to see whether a salesman was around
From wordnet.princeton.edu