Etymology
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Words related to pasta

quash (v.)

the modern English word is a merger of two words, both in Middle English as quashen, from two unrelated Latin verbs.

1. "to suppress, overcome" (mid-13c.); "to make void, annul, nullify, veto" (mid-14c.), from Old French quasser, quassier, casser "to annul, declare void," and directly from Medieval Latin quassare, alteration of Late Latin cassare, from cassus "null, void, empty" (from extended form of PIE root *kes- "to cut"). The meaning "subdue, put down summarily" is from c. 1600.

2. "to break, crush, beat to pieces" early 14c., from Old French quasser, casser "to break, smash, destroy; maltreat, injure, harm, weaken," from Latin quassare "to shatter, shake or toss violently," frequentative of quatere (past participle quassus) "to shake," from PIE root *kwet- "to shake" (source also of Greek passein "to sprinkle," Lithuanian kutėti "to shake up," Old Saxon skuddian "to move violently," German schütteln "to shake," Old English scudan "to hasten").

In Medieval Latin, quassare often was used for cassare, and in later French the form of both words is casser. The words in English now are somewhat, or entirely, fused. Related: Quashed; quashing.

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impasto (n.)
"laying on of colors thickly and boldly," 1784, from Italian impasto, noun of action from impastare "to raise paste; to put in paste," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + pasta "paste" (see pasta). Nativized form impaste is attested from 1540s as "enclose in paste," 1727 in reference to painting. Related: Impastoed; impastation.
paste (n.)

c. 1300 (mid-12c. as a surname), "dough for the making of bread or pastry," from Old French paste "dough, pastry" (13c., Modern French pâte), from Late Latin pasta "dough, pastry cake, paste" (see pasta). Meaning "glue mixture, dough used as a plaster seal" is attested from c. 1400; broader sense of "a composition just moist enough to be soft without liquefying" is by c. 1600. In reference to a kind of heavy glass made of ground quartz, etc., often used to imitate gems, by 1660s.

pastel (n.)

1660s, "crayons, chalk-like pigment used in crayons," from French pastel "crayon," from Italian pastello "a pastel," literally "material reduced to a paste," probably from Late Latin pastellus, diminutive of pasta "dough, paste" (see pasta). The word was applied to pale or light colors (like that of pastels) by 1899. As an adjective from 1884.

pastiche (n.)
"a medley made up of fragments from different works," 1878, from French pastiche (18c.), from Italian pasticcio "medley, pastry cake," from Vulgar Latin *pasticium "composed of paste," from Late Latin pasta "paste, pastry cake" (see pasta). Borrowed earlier (1752) in the Italian form.
pasty (n.)

c. 1300, "a type of meat pie, a pie covered with paste or pie crust," especially one of venison or other seasoned meat, from Old French paste "dough, pastry," from Vulgar Latin *pastata "meat wrapped in pastry" from Latin pasta "dough, paste" (see pasta).

patisserie (n.)
1784, from French pâtisserie "pastry shop," from pâtisser "pastry-seller, pastry-cook," from Old French pasticier (14c.), from Medieval Latin pasticium "pasty, composed of paste," from Late Latin pasta "paste, pastry cake" (see pasta).