Etymology
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oyster (n.)

"edible bivalve mollusk of the family Ostreidæ," late 13c., oistre, from Old French oistre, uistre (Modern French huître) and directly from Latin ostrea, plural or fem. of ostreum "oyster," from Greek ostreon, from PIE root *ost- "bone." It is thus related to Greek ostrakon "a hard shell" and to osteon "a bone." The h- in the modern French word is a regular development; compare huile "oil" (Latin oleum), huit "eight" (Latin octo).

Why then the world's mine Oyster, which I, with sword will open. [Shakespeare, "The Merry Wives of Windsor," II.ii.2]

Oyster-bed "place where oysters breed or are bred" is from c. 1600; oyster-knife, used for opening oysters, is recorded from 1690s. Oysterman "man engaged in rearing, taking, or selling oysters" is attested from 1550s. The common statement that edible oysters are in season only in months that end in -r is recorded by 1765.

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Definitions of oyster
1
oyster (n.)
marine mollusks having a rough irregular shell; found on the sea bed mostly in coastal waters;
oyster (n.)
edible body of any of numerous oysters;
Synonyms: huitre
oyster (n.)
a small muscle on each side of the back of a fowl;
2
oyster (v.)
gather oysters, dig oysters;
From wordnet.princeton.edu

Dictionary entries near oyster

oxygen

oxymoron

oy

oyer

oyez

oyster

Oz

oz.

Ozark

Ozarks

ozone