Etymology
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outward (adj.)

Old English utweard "to or toward the outside, external" (of an enclosure, a surface, etc.), earlier utanweard, from ute, utan "outside" (from ut; see out) + -weard (see -ward). Compare Old Frisian utward, Old High German uzwertes, German auswärts. Related: Outwardly; outwardness. Outwards, with adverbial genitive, was in Old English. 

Meaning "externally apparent, outwardly shown, so as to be exterior or visible" is from late 14c. Of persons, in reference to the external appearance (usually opposed to inner feelings), it is attested from c. 1500. As an adverb, "on the outside," in Old English (utaword); also "away from or out of place or position" (late 13c.).

Outward-bound "directed on a course out from home port" is recorded from c. 1600; with capital initials, it refers to a sea school founded in 1941. Outward man (1520s), in theology refers to "the body," as opposed to the soul or spirit.

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Definitions of outward
1
outward (adj.)
relating to physical reality rather than with thoughts or the mind;
a concern with outward beauty rather than with inward reflections
outward (adj.)
that is going out or leaving;
an outward journey
outward-bound ships
Synonyms: outbound / outward-bound
2
outward (adv.)
toward the outside;
move the needle further outward!
Synonyms: outwards
From wordnet.princeton.edu