Etymology
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Words related to organism

organize (v.)

early 15c., organisen, "to construct, establish," from Old French organiser and directly from Medieval Latin organizare, from Latin organum "instrument, organ" (see organ). Meaning "to form into a whole consisting of interdependent parts" is from 1630s. The intransitive sense of "assume an organic structure" is by 1880. Related: Organized; organizing; organizable.

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-ism 

word-forming element making nouns implying a practice, system, doctrine, etc., from French -isme or directly from Latin -isma, -ismus (source also of Italian, Spanish -ismo, Dutch, German -ismus), from Greek -ismos, noun ending signifying the practice or teaching of a thing, from the stem of verbs in -izein, a verb-forming element denoting the doing of the noun or adjective to which it is attached. For distinction of use, see -ity. The related Greek suffix -isma(t)- affects some forms.

cyborg (n.)

"a man-machine hybrid, a human modified by integrated machinery to have extended powers," 1960, a blend of the first elements of cybernetic and organism.

micro-organism (n.)

also microorganism, "a microscopic organism," 1855, from micro- + organism.

*werg- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to do."

It forms all or part of: allergic; allergy; argon; boulevard; bulwark; cholinergic; demiurge; dramaturge; energy; erg (n.1) "unit of energy;" ergative; ergonomics; ergophobia; George; georgic; handiwork; irk; lethargic; lethargy; liturgy; metallurgy; organ; organelle; organic; organism; organize; orgy; surgeon; surgery; synergism; synergy; thaumaturge; work; wright; wrought; zymurgy.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek ergon "work," orgia "religious performances;" Armenian gorc "work;" Avestan vareza "work, activity;" Gothic waurkjan, Old English wyrcan "to work," Old English weorc "deed, action, something done;" Old Norse yrka "work, take effect."