Etymology
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ordinary (adj.)

c. 1400, ordinarie, "regular, customary, belonging to the usual order or course, conformed to a regulated sequence or arrangement," from Old French ordinarie "ordinary, usual" and directly from Latin ordinarius "customary, regular, usual, orderly," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)).

From 1580s as "common in occurrence, not distinguished in any way." Its various noun uses, dating to late 14c. and common until 19c., are now largely extinct except in out of the ordinary (1893) in which the sense of ordinary is "established or due sequence; something regular or customary." In British education, Ordinary level (abbrev. O level), "lowest of the three levels of General Certificate of Education," is attested from 1947. Related: Ordinarily.

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Definitions of ordinary
1
ordinary (n.)
a judge of a probate court;
ordinary (n.)
the expected or commonplace condition or situation;
not out of the ordinary
ordinary (n.)
a clergyman appointed to prepare condemned prisoners for death;
ordinary (n.)
an early bicycle with a very large front wheel and small back wheel;
Synonyms: ordinary bicycle
ordinary (n.)
(heraldry) any of several conventional figures used on shields;
2
ordinary (adj.)
not exceptional in any way especially in quality or ability or size or degree;
ordinary decency
an ordinary day
an ordinary wine
ordinary everyday objects
ordinary (adj.)
lacking special distinction, rank, or status; commonly encountered;
the ordinary (or common) man in the street
Synonyms: average
From wordnet.princeton.edu