Etymology
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ordain (v.)

c. 1300, ordeinen, "to appoint or admit to the ministry of the Church," also "to decree, enact," from stem of Old French ordener "place in order, arrange, prepare; consecrate, designate" (Modern French ordonner) and directly from Latin ordinare "put in order, arrange, dispose, appoint," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). The notion is "to confer holy orders upon." Sense of "establish, set (something) that will continue in a certain order" is from early 14c. Related: Ordained; ordaining.

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Definitions of ordain

ordain (v.)
order by virtue of superior authority; decree;
The King ordained the persecution and expulsion of the Jews
Synonyms: enact
ordain (v.)
appoint to a clerical posts;
he was ordained in the Church
Synonyms: consecrate / ordinate / order
ordain (v.)
invest with ministerial or priestly authority;
The minister was ordained only last month
ordain (v.)
issue an order;
From wordnet.princeton.edu