Etymology
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Words related to oral

osseous (adj.)

"bony, made of bones," early 15c., ossuous, ossous, from Medieval Latin ossous, from Latin osseus "bony, of bone," from os (genitive ossis) "bone," from PIE root *ost- "bone." The word later was reformed in English (1680s), perhaps by influence of French osseux.

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bouche (n.)
French, literally "mouth" (Old French boche, 11c.), from Latin bucca "cheek," which in Late Latin replaced os (see oral) as the word for "mouth" (and also is the source of Italian bocca, Spanish boca). De Vaan writes that "The meaning 'mouth' is secondary, and was originally used in a derogatory way." It is perhaps from Celtic, Germanic, or a non-IE substrate language. Borrowed in English in various senses, such as "king's allowance of food for his retinue" (mid-15c.); "mouth" (1580s); "metal plug for a cannon's vent" (1862; verb in this sense from 1781).
Auriga 
northern constellation, from Latin auriga "a charioteer, driver," also the name of the constellation, which is often explained as from aureae "reins, bridle of a horse" (from os, genitive oris, "mouth;" see oral) + agere "set in motion, drive, lead" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move"). Its bright star is capella.
orator (n.)

late 14c., oratour, "an eloquent or skilled speaker; one who pleads or argues for a cause," from Anglo-French oratour (Modern French orateur) and directly from Latin orator "speaker," from ōrare "to speak, speak before a court or assembly, pray to, plead."

This is sometimes said to be  from PIE root *or- "to pronounce a ritual formula" (source also of Sanskrit aryanti "they praise," Homeric Greek are, Attic ara "prayer," Hittite ariya- "to ask the oracle," aruwai- "to revere, worship").  But according to de Vaan, the Latin word is rather from Proto-Italic *ōs- "mouth," from PIE *os- "mouth" (see oral). He writes:

The chronology of the attestations shows that 'to plead, speak openly' is the original meaning of orare .... The alternative etymology ... seems very unlikely to me: a connection with Skt. a-aryanti 'they acknowledge' and Ru. orat' 'to shout', since nothing suggests a meaning 'to shout' for the Latin verb, nor does it seem onomatopoeic.

The general meaning "public speaker," is attested from early 15c. Fem. forms were oratrice (early 15c., from Anglo-French); oratrix (mid-15c., from Latin); oratress (1580s).

ore rotundo (adv.)

1720, Latin, literally "with round mouth," from ablative of os "mouth" (see oral) + ablative of rotundus "round" (see rotund). From Horace ("Grais ingenium, Grais dedit ore rotundo Musa loqui," in "Ars Poetica").

orifice (n.)

"an opening, a mouth or aperture," early 15c., from Old French orifice "the opening of a wound" (14c.) and directly from Late Latin orificium "an opening," literally "mouth-making," from Latin os (genitive oris) "mouth" (see oral) + combining form of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Orificial.

oscillation (n.)

"kind of vibration in which a body swings backward and forward," 1650s, from French oscillation and directly from Latin oscillationem (nominative oscillatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of oscillare "to swing," from oscillum "a swing," which usually is identified with the oscillum that meant "little face" (literally "little mouth"), a mask of open-mouthed Bacchus hung up in vineyards as a charm (the sense evolution would be via the notion of "swinging in the breeze"); from PIE *os- "mouth" (see oral). Figurative use, in reference to a swinging back and forth (in opinion, attitude, etc.) is by 1798.

oscitant (adj.)

"sleepy, drowsy, sluggish," literally "yawning, gaping," 1620s, from Latin oscitans "listless, sluggish, lazy," present participle of oscitare "to gape, yawn," from os citare "to move the mouth" (see oral and cite). Related: Oscitancy.

osculate (v.)

"to kiss (one another)," 1650s, from Latin osculatus, past participle of osculari "to kiss," from osculum "a kiss; pretty mouth, sweet mouth," literally "little mouth," diminutive of os "mouth" (see oral). Related: Osculated; osculating; osculant; osculatory.

usher (n.)
late 13c., "servant who has charge of doors and admits people to a chamber, hall, etc.," from Anglo-French usser (12c.), Old French ussier, uissier "porter, doorman," from Vulgar Latin *ustiarius "doorkeeper," variant of Latin ostiarius "door-keeper," from ostium "door, entrance," from os "mouth," from PIE *os- "mouth" (see oral). Fem. form usherette is attested from 1913, American English.