Etymology
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open (adj.)

Old English open "not closed down, raised up" (of gates, eyelids, etc.), also "exposed, evident, well-known, public," often in a bad sense, "notorious, shameless;" from Proto-Germanic *upana-, literally "put or set up" (source also of Old Norse opinn, Swedish öppen, Danish aaben, Old Saxon opan, Old Frisian epen, Old High German offan, German offen "open"), from PIE root *upo "under," also "up from under," hence also "over." Related to up, and throughout Germanic the word has the appearance of a past participle of *up (v.), but no such verb has been found. The source of words for "open" in many Indo-European languages seems to be an opposite of the word for "closed, shut" (such as Gothic uslukan).

Of physical spaces, "unobstructed, unencumbered," c. 1200; of rooms with unclosed entrances, c. 1300; of wounds, late 14c. Transferred sense of "frank, candid" is attested from early 14c. Of shops, etc., "available for business," it dates from 1824.

Open-door in reference to international trading policies is attested from 1856. Open season is recorded by 1895 of game; figuratively (of persons) by 1914. Open book in the figurative sense of "person easy to understand" is from 1853. Open house "hospitality for all visitors" is first recorded 1824. Open-and-shut "simple, straightforward" first recorded 1841 in New Orleans. Open-faced, of sandwiches, etc., "without an upper layer of bread, etc.," by 1934. Open marriage, one in which the partners sleep with whomever they please, is by 1972. Open road (1817, American English) originally meant a public one; romanticized sense of "traveling as an expression of personal freedom" first recorded 1856, in Whitman.

open (n.)

early 13c., "an aperture or opening," from open (adj.). Sense of "an open or clear space" is by 1796. The open "open country" is from 1620s; as "open air" from 1875. Meaning "public knowledge" (especially in out in the open) is from 1942, but compare Middle English in open (late 14c.) "manifestly, publicly." The sense of "an open competition" is from 1926, originally in a golf context.

open (v.)

Old English openian "to open, open up, cause to open, disclose, reveal," also intransitive, "become manifest, be open to or exposed to," from Proto-Germanic *opanojan (source also of Old Saxon opanon, Old Norse opna "to open," Middle Dutch, Dutch openen, Old High German offanon, German öffnen), from the source of open (adj.), but etymology suggests the adjective is older. Transitive sense of "set in action, begin, commence" is from 1690s. Open up (intrans.) in the figurative sense "cease to be secretive" is from 1921. Related: Opened; opening.

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Definitions of open
1
open (adj.)
not requiring union membership;
an open shop employs nonunion workers
open (adj.)
affording unobstructed entrance and exit; not shut or closed;
an open door
they left the door open
Synonyms: unfastened
open (adj.)
affording free passage or access;
open drains
open ranks
the road is open to traffic
open (adj.)
with no protection or shield;
open to the weather
an open wound
Synonyms: exposed
open (adj.)
open to or in view of all;
an open protest
an open letter to the editor
open (adj.)
used of mouth or eyes;
keep your eyes open
his mouth slightly opened
Synonyms: opened
open (adj.)
not having been filled;
the job is still open
open (adj.)
accessible to all;
an open economy
open season
open (adj.)
not defended or capable of being defended;
an open city
open to attack
Synonyms: assailable / undefendable / undefended
open (adj.)
(of textures) full of small openings or gaps;
an open texture
Synonyms: loose
open (adj.)
having no protecting cover or enclosure;
an open fire
open sports cars
an open boat
open (adj.)
(set theory) of an interval that contains neither of its endpoints;
open (adj.)
not brought to a conclusion; subject to further thought;
an open question
open (adj.)
not sealed or having been unsealed;
the letter was already open
the opened package lay on the table
Synonyms: opened
open (adj.)
without undue constriction as from e.g. tenseness or inhibition;
the clarity and resonance of an open tone
her natural and open response
open (adj.)
possibly accepting or permitting;
open to interpretation
an issue open to question
Synonyms: capable / subject
open (adj.)
affording free passage or view;
open waters
the open countryside
Synonyms: clear
open (adj.)
openly straightforward and direct without reserve or secretiveness;
an open and trusting nature
Synonyms: candid / heart-to-heart
open (adj.)
ready for business;
the stores are open
open (adj.)
ready or willing to receive favorably;
Synonyms: receptive
open (adj.)
open and observable; not secret or hidden;
open ballots
Synonyms: overt
2
open (v.)
cause to open or to become open;
Mary opened the car door
Synonyms: open up
open (v.)
start to operate or function or cause to start operating or functioning;
open a business
Synonyms: open up
open (v.)
become open;
The door opened
Synonyms: open up
open (v.)
begin or set in action, of meetings, speeches, recitals, etc.;
He opened the meeting with a long speech
open (v.)
spread out or open from a closed or folded state;
open the map
Synonyms: unfold / spread / spread out
open (v.)
make available;
This opens up new possibilities
Synonyms: open up
open (v.)
become available;
an opportunity opened up
Synonyms: open up
open (v.)
have an opening or passage or outlet;
The bedrooms open into the hall
open (v.)
make the opening move;
Kasparov opened with a standard opening
open (v.)
afford access to;
the door opens to the patio
Synonyms: afford / give
open (v.)
display the contents of a file or start an application as on a computer;
3
open (n.)
a clear or unobstructed space or expanse of land or water;
finally broke out of the forest into the open
Synonyms: clear
open (n.)
where the air is unconfined;
camping in the open
the concert was held in the open air
Synonyms: outdoors / out-of-doors / open air
open (n.)
a tournament in which both professionals and amateurs may play;
open (n.)
information that has become public;
all the reports were out in the open
Synonyms: surface
From wordnet.princeton.edu