Etymology
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Words related to omni-

*op- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to work, produce in abundance."

It forms all or part of: cooperate; cooperation; copious; copy; cornucopia; hors d'oeuvre; inure; maneuver; manure; oeuvre; office; official; officinal; omni-; omnibus; omnium gatherum; op. cit.; opera; operate; operation; operose; optimism; optimum; opulence; opulent; opus; Oscan.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit apas- "work, religious act," apnas- "possession, property;" Hittite happina- "rich;" Avestan huapah- "doing good work, masterly;" Latin opus "a work, labor, exertion;" Greek ompne "food, corn;" Old High German uoben "to start work, to practice, to honor;" German üben "to exercise, practice;" Dutch oefenen, Old Norse æfa, Danish øve "to exercise, practice;" Old English æfnan "to perform, work, do," afol "power."

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omnibus (n.)

1829, "long-bodied, four-wheeled public vehicle with seats for passengers," from French (voiture) omnibus "(carriage) for all, common (conveyance)," from Latin omnibus "for all," dative plural of omnis "all" (see omni-). Introduced by Jacques Lafitte in Paris in 1819 or '20, used in London from 1829.

As an adjective, in reference to legislation, "designed to cover many different cases, embracing numerous distinct objects," recorded from 1835; in U.S., used especially of the Compromise of 1850. Noun meaning "man or boy who assists a waiter at a restaurant" is attested from 1888 (compare busboy).

omnidirectional (adj.)

1927, "of equal power in all directions," from omni- "all" + directional (see direction).

omnifarious (adj.)

"of all varieties, forms, or kinds," 1650s, from Late Latin omnifarius "of all sorts," from Latin omnifariam "in all places or parts, on all sides," from omnis "all" (see omni-) + -fariam "parts" (see -farious). Related: Omnifariously; omnifariousness.

omnipotence (n.)

mid-15c., omnipotens, "unlimited divine power," from Old French omnipotence, from Late Latin omnipotentia "almighty power," from Latin omnipotentem (nominative omnipotens) "all-powerful, almighty," from omnis "all" (see omni-) + potens (genitive potentis) "powerful" (see potent). Related: Omnipotency (late 15c.).

This attribute is in theology differentiated from the abstract idea of omnipotence, understood as capability of doing anything whatever (with no limitation from moral considerations), and is limited by the holiness of God, in accordance with which it is impossible for him to do wrong. [Century Dictionary]
omnipotent (adj.)

early 14c., "almighty, possessing infinite power," from Old French omnipotent "almighty, all-powerful" (11c.) and directly from Latin omnipotentem (nominative omnipotens) "all-powerful, almighty," from omnis "all" (see omni-) + potens (genitive potentis) "powerful" (see potent). Originally of God or a deity; general sense of "having absolute power or authority" is attested from 1590s. Related: Omnipotently.

omnipresence (n.)

"quality of being in all places simultaneously," c. 1600, from Medieval Latin omnipraesentia, from omnipraesens "present everywhere," from Latin omnis "all, every" (see omni-) + praesens "present" (see present (adj.)).

omnipresent (adj.)

"everywhere present, in all places at the same time," c. 1600, from Medieval Latin omnipraesentem (nominative omnipraesens) "present everywhere," from Latin omnis "all, every" (see omni-) + praesens"present" (see present (adj.)). Related: Omnipresently.

omniscience (n.)

"infinite knowledge, the quality or attribute of fully knowing all things," 1610s, from Medieval Latin omniscientia "all-knowledge," from Latin omnis "all" (see omni-) + scientia "knowledge" (see science).

omniscient (adj.)

"possessing knowledge of all things, having universal knowledge," c. 1600, from Modern Latin omniscientem (nominative omnisciens) "all-knowing," a back-formation from Medieval Latin omniscientia "all-knowledge," from Latin omnis "all" (see omni-) + scientia "knowledge" (see science). Related: Omnisciently.