Etymology
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Words related to occident

occasion (n.)

late 14c., occasioun, "opportunity; grounds for action or feeling; state of affairs that makes something else possible; a happening, occurrence leading to some result," from Old French ochaison, ocasion "cause, reason, excuse, pretext; opportunity" (13c.) or directly from Latin occasionem (nominative occasio) "opportunity, appropriate time," in Late Latin "cause," from occasum, occasus, past participle of occidere "fall down, go down," from ob "down, away" (see ob-) + -cidere, combining form of cadere "to fall" (from PIE root *kad- "to fall"). The notion is of a "falling together," or juncture, of circumstances. The sense of "the time or a time at which something happens" is from 1560s.

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Europe 

from Latin Europa "Europe," from Greek Europe, which is of uncertain origin; as a geographic name first recorded in the Homeric hymn to Apollo (522 B.C.E. or earlier):

"Telphusa, here I am minded to make a glorious temple, an oracle for men, and hither they will always bring perfect hecatombs, both those who live in rich Peloponnesus and those of Europe and all the wave-washed isles, coming to seek oracles."

Often explained as "broad face," from eurys "wide" (see eury-) + ops "face," literally "eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see"). But also traditionally linked with Europa, Phoenician princess in Greek mythology. Klein (citing Heinrich Lewy) suggests a possible Semitic origin in Akkad. erebu "to go down, set" (in reference to the sun) which would parallel occident. Another suggestion along those lines is Phoenician 'ereb "evening," hence "west."

*kad- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to fall."

It forms all or part of: accident; cadaver; cadence; caducous; cascade; case (n.1); casual; casualty; casuist; casus belli; chance; cheat; chute (n.1); coincide; decadence; decay; deciduous; escheat; incident; occasion; occident; recidivist.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sad- "to fall down;" Latin casus "a chance, occasion, opportunity; accident, mishap," literally "a falling," cadere "to fall, sink, settle down, decline, perish;" Armenian chacnum "to fall, become low;" perhaps also Middle Irish casar "hail, lightning."
occidental (adj.)

c. 1400, "to, of, or in the west (of the sky or the earth)," from Old French occidental (14c.) and directly from Latin occidentalis "western," from occidentem (see occident). Meaning "of, pertaining to, or characteristic of the western regions of the earth (especially Western Europe and its derivative civilizations in the western hemisphere" (opposed to oriental), 1550s. As a capitalized noun meaning "a Western person" (opposed to Oriental) it is attested from 1823. Related: Occidentalism; occidentalist.

Those who inhabit (to us) the western regions of the world, and to express whom the English language wants a word, the opposite of Orientals; though word-coining be much condemned, I will venture to employ Occidentalsas substantive and say, (etc.) ["The Bee," 1823]