Etymology
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obtuse (adj.)

early 15c., "dull, blunted, not sharp," from Latin obtusus "blunted, dull," also used figuratively, past participle of obtundere "to beat against, make dull," from ob "in front of; against" (see ob-) + tundere "to beat," from PIE *(s)tud-e- "to beat, strike, push, thrust," from root *(s)teu- "to push, stick, knock, beat" (source also of Latin tudes "hammer," Sanskrit tudati "he thrusts"). Sense of "stupid, not acutely sensitive or perceptive" is by c. 1500. In geometry, in reference to a plane angle greater than a right angle," 1560s. Related: Obtusely; obtuseness.

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Definitions of obtuse

obtuse (adj.)
of an angle; between 90 and 180 degrees;
obtuse (adj.)
(of a leaf shape) rounded at the apex;
obtuse (adj.)
lacking in insight or discernment; "a purblind oligarchy that flatly refused to see that history was condemning it to the dustbin"- Jasper Griffin;
too obtuse to grasp the implications of his behavior
Synonyms: purblind
obtuse (adj.)
slow to learn or understand; lacking intellectual acuity; "although dull at classical learning, at mathematics he was uncommonly quick"- Thackeray;
he was either normally stupid or being deliberately obtuse
Synonyms: dense / dim / dull / dumb / slow
From wordnet.princeton.edu