Etymology
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Words related to non-

non-exclusive (adj.)

also nonexclusive, "not restricted to any group, entity, or region, available to all," 1836, from non- + exclusive. Related: non-exclusively; non-exclusiveness.

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non-existence (n.)

also nonexistence, "absence of existence, the condition of not existing," 1640s; see non- + existence. Middle English in this sense had non-being (mid-15c.).

non-existent (adj.)

also nonexistent, "not having existence," 1680s, from non- + existent. Earlier as a noun, "a thing or person that does not exist" (1650s).

non-fat (adj.)

also nonfat, "containing no fat, with the fat removed," 1945, from non- + fat.

nonfeasance (n.)

also non-feasance, "failure to do what should be done, the omission of some act which ought to have been performed," 1590s, from non- + feasance.

non-fiction (adj.)

also nonfiction, of prose writing or books, "telling of facts, real events, and real people," 1866, a librarians' word, first in the reports of the Boston Public Library, from non- + fiction. Apparently not in widespread use until after 1900.

non-importation (n.)

also nonimportation, "a refraining from importing," 1770, from non- + importation.

non-intercourse (n.)

"a refraining from intercourse," in any sense, 1809, from non- + intercourse.

Non-Intercourse Act, an act of the United States Congress of 1809 passed in retaliation for claims made by France and Great Britain affecting the commerce of the United States, and particularly the personal rights of United States seamen, continued 1809 and 1810, and against Great Britain 1811. It prohibited the entry of merchant vessels belonging to those countries into the ports of the United States, and the importation of goods grown or manufactured in those countries. [Century Dictionary]
non-intervention (n.)

also nonintervention, "act or policy of a nation of not intervening in the affairs of other nations," 1831, from non- + intervention.

non-invasive (adj.)

also noninvasive, "not tending to spread; not require the introduction of instruments into the body," by 1850, from non- + invasive.

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