Etymology
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Words related to net

*ned- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to bind, tie."

It forms all or part of: annex; annexation; connect; connection; denouement; net (n.) "netting, network, mesh used for capturing;" nettle; nexus; node; nodule; noose.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit nahyati "binds, ties;" Latin nodus "knot;" Old Irish nascim "I bind, oblige;" Old English net "netting, network."
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neat (adj.)

1540s, "clean, free from dirt," from Anglo-French neit, French net "clear, pure" (12c.), from Latin nitidus "well-favored, elegant, trim," literally "gleaming," from nitere "to shine," from PIE root *nei- "to shine" (source also of Middle Irish niam "gleam, splendor," niamda "shining;" Old Irish noib "holy," niab "strength;" Welsh nwyfiant "gleam, splendor").

From 1540s as "well-shaped, well-proportioned; characterized by nicety of appearance." Meaning "inclined to be tidy" is from 1570s; sense of "in good order" is from 1590s. Of liquor, "straight, undiluted," c. 1800, from meaning "unadulterated" (of wine), which is first attested 1570s. Informal sense of "very good, desirable" is noted by 1934 in American English, but in many earlier senses in English since 17c. neat seems to be simply a vague commendatory word; variant neato is teenager slang, by 1968. Related: Neatly; neatness.

bobbinet (n.)
"machine-made cotton netting," 1819, earlier bobbin-net (1814), from bobbin + net (n.).
dragnet (n.)

also drag-net, "a net to draw along the bottom of a body of water for taking fish," 1540s, from see drag (v.) + net (n.). Figurative use is from 1640s; police sense attested by 1894. Probably not directly from Old English drægnet, which became early Middle English draynet and then vanished.

drift-net (n.)

"gill net, held upright in water by floats and extended by weights below, that drifts with the tides," 1660s, from drift (v.) + net (n.).

fishnet (n.)

"net used to catch fish," Old English fiscnett; see fish (n.) + net (n.). From 1881 in reference to a type of stitch that resembles fishnet. By 1912 in reference to women's hosiery.

There has been considerable misconception as to the purpose of the fishnet hose imported by the ECONOMIST and illustrated on page 177. The newspaper representatives who viewed it at the ECONOMIST'S fashion exhibition used it as a pretext for many humorous articles and conveyed the impression that it was to be worn next the skin. The purpose is to use it over white or colored hose, to produce an unusual effect. Every store should have one or more pairs for exhibition purposes, if for no other reason. [Dry Goods Economist, June 22, 1912]
network (n.)

1550s, "net-like arrangement of threads, wires, etc., anything formed in the manner of or presenting the appearance of a net or netting," from net (n.) + work (n.). Extended sense of "any complex, interlocking system" is from 1839 (originally in reference to transport by rivers, canals, and railways). Meaning "broadcasting system of multiple transmitters" is from 1914; sense of "interconnected group of people" is by 1934 in psychology jargon.

gross (n.)
"a dozen dozen," early 15c., from Old French grosse douzaine "large dozen;" see gross (adj.). Earlier as the name of a measure of weight equal to one-eighth of a dram (early 15c.). Sense of "total profit" (opposed to net (adj.)) is from 1520s.