Etymology
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navy (n.)

mid-14c., navie, "fleet of ships," especially for purposes of war, from Old French navie "fleet; ship," from Latin navigia, plural of navigium "vessel, boat," from navis "ship," from PIE root *nau- "boat."

Meaning "a nation's collective, organized sea power" is from 1530s. The Old English words were sciphere (usually of Viking invaders) and scipfierd (usually of the home defenses). Navy blue was the color of the British naval uniform. Navy bean attested from 1856, so called because they were grown to be used by the Navy. Navy-yard "government dockyard," in the U.S. "a dockyard where government ships are built or repaired" is by 1842.

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Definitions of navy
1
navy (n.)
an organization of military vessels belonging to a country and available for sea warfare;
Synonyms: naval forces
navy (n.)
a dark shade of blue;
Synonyms: dark blue / navy blue
2
Navy (n.)
the navy of the United States of America; the agency that maintains and trains and equips combat-ready naval forces;
Synonyms: United States Navy / US Navy / usn
From wordnet.princeton.edu