Etymology
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Words related to naked

denudation (n.)

early 15c., denudacioun, "act of stripping off covering, a making bare," from Late Latin denudationem (nominative denudatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin denudare "to lay bare, strip; uncover, expose," from de "away" (see de-) + nudare "to strip," from nudus "naked, bare" (see naked). Figurative use is from 1590s. In geology, "erosion," from 1811.

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denude (v.)

early 15c. "strip or divest of all covering, lay bare" (implied in denuded), from Latin denudare "to lay bare, strip; uncover, expose," from de "away" (see de-) + nudare "to strip," from nudus "naked, bare" (see naked). In geology, "to wear away and remove surface matter, make bare the underlying rocks" (1845). Related: Denuding.

gymnasium (n.)
1590s, "place of exercise," from Latin gymnasium "school for gymnastics," from Greek gymnasion "public place where athletic exercises are practiced; gymnastics school," in plural, "bodily exercises," from gymnazein "to exercise or train," literally or figuratively, literally "to train naked," from gymnos "naked," from a metathesis of PIE *nogw-mo-, suffixed form of *nogw- "naked" (see naked).

A feature of all ancient Greek communities, at first it was merely an open space, later with extensive facilities and including training for the mind as well as the body. Hence its use in German from 15c. as a name for "high school" (more or less paralleling a sense also in Latin); in English it has remained purely athletic. For the "continental high school sense," English in 19c. sometimes used gymnastical as an adjective, gymnasiast for a student.
gymno- 
before vowels gymn-, word-forming element meaning "naked, stripped, bare," from Greek gymnos "naked, unclad; bare, mere," from a metathesis of PIE *nogw-mo-, suffixed form of *nogw- "naked" (see naked).
gymnosophist (n.)
c. 1400, from Greek gymnosophistai "the naked philosophers," from gymnos "naked" (see naked) + sophistes "wise man" (see sophist). Ancient Hindu holy men whose self-denial extended to clothes; they were known to the later Greeks through the reports of Alexander the Great's soldiers.
nake (v.)

"to make naked," mid-14c., naken, from naked, perhaps with misapprehension of the -d as a past tense suffix. Marked as "Obs[olete] exc[ept] Sc[ottish]" in OED. Earlier was naken "to strip naked" (mid-13c.); a later generation coined nakedize (1858).

nakedly (adj.)

c. 1200, "without concealment, plainly, openly," from naked + -ly (1).

nakedness (n.)

Old English nacedness "nudity, bareness;" see naked + -ness.

nude (adj.)

1530s, a legal term, "unsupported, not formally attested," from Latin nudus "naked, bare, unclothed, stripped," from PIE root *nogw- "naked" (see naked). General sense of "mere, plain, simple" is attested from 1550s. In reference to the human body, "unclothed, undraped," it is an artistic euphemism for naked, dating from 1610s (implied in nudity) but not in common use in this sense until mid-19c.

nudi- 

word-forming element meaning "hairless; leafless; naked," from combining form of Latin nudus "naked, bare, stripped," from PIE root *nogw- "naked" (see naked).