Etymology
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mute (adj.)

late 14c., mewet "silent, not speaking," from Old French muet "dumb, mute" (12c.), diminutive of mut, mo, from Latin mutus "silent, speechless, dumb," probably from imitative base *meue- (source also of Sanskrit mukah "dumb," Greek myein "to be shut," of the mouth). Form assimilated in 16c. to Latin mutus. The meaning "incapable of utterance, dumb" is by mid-15c.

mute (v.)

in music, "deaden the sound of," 1861, from mute (n.). Related: Muted; muting.

mute (n.)

late 14c. (late 12c. as a surname), "person who does not speak" (from inability, unwillingness, etc.), from mute (adj.). From 1570s as "stage actor in a dumb show." The musical sense "device to deaden the resonance or tone of an instrument" is by 1811 of stringed instruments, 1841 of horns.

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Definitions of mute
1
mute (n.)
a deaf person who is unable to speak;
Synonyms: deaf-mute / deaf-and-dumb person
mute (n.)
a device used to soften the tone of a musical instrument;
2
mute (adj.)
expressed without speech; "best grief is tongueless"- Emily Dickinson; "choking exasperation and wordless shame"- Thomas Wolfe;
a mute appeal
mute (adj.)
unable to speak because of hereditary deafness;
Synonyms: dumb / silent
3
mute (v.)
deaden (a sound or noise), especially by wrapping;
Synonyms: muffle / dull / damp / dampen / tone down
From wordnet.princeton.edu