Etymology
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Words related to mug

mug-shot (n.)

also mugshot, "photograph taken by police of a person after an arrest for identification purposes," 1950; see mug (n.2) "a person's face" + shot (n.) in the photographic sense.

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mugger (n.)

"one who commits violent robbery," 1865, agent noun from mug (v.1).

mugging (n.)

1846, "a beating;" by 1939 as "a violent physical robbery;" verbal noun from mug (v.1). As "grimmacing, making faces," 1937, from mug (v.2).

muggins (n.)

"fool, simpleton," 1855, of unknown origin, apparently from the surname and perhaps influenced by slang mug "dupe, fool" (1851; see mug (n.2)). It also was the name of simple card game (1855) and the word each player tried to call out before the other in the game when two cards matched. The name turns up frequently in humor magazines, "comic almanacks," etc. in 1840s and 1850s.