Etymology
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mucus (n.)

"viscid fluid secreted by the mucous membranes of animals," 1660s (replacing Middle English mucilage), from Latin mucus "slime, mold, mucus of the nose, snot," from PIE root *meug- "slippery, slimy," with derivatives referring to wet or slimy substances or conditions (source also of Latin emungere "to sneeze out, blow one's nose," mucere "be moldy or musty," Greek myssesthai "to blow the nose," myxa "mucus;" Sanskrit muncati "he releases"). Old English had horh, which may be imitative.

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Definitions of mucus

mucus (n.)
protective secretion of the mucous membranes; in the gut it lubricates the passage of food and protects the epithelial cells; in the nose and throat and lungs it can make it difficult for bacteria to penetrate the body through the epithelium;
Synonyms: mucous secretion
From wordnet.princeton.edu