Etymology
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moving (adj.)

late 14c., "that moves," present-participle adjective from move (v.). From 1650s as "that causes motion;" 1590s as "that touches the feelings." Moving picture in the cinematographic sense is by 1896 (earlier in reference to the zoetrope, 1709). Moving Day is by 1832, American English; traditionally in New York city it was May 1. Moving target (1833) is from gunnery.

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Definitions of moving

moving (adj.)
arousing or capable of arousing deep emotion; "she laid her case of destitution before him in a very moving letter"- N. Hawthorne;
moving (adj.)
in motion;
the moving parts of the machine
a constantly moving crowd
moving (adj.)
used of a series of photographs presented so as to create the illusion of motion;
Her ambition was to be in moving pictures or `the movies'
From wordnet.princeton.edu