Etymology
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motion (n.)

late 14c., mocioun, "process of moving; change of place, continuous variation of position;" also "suggestion, proposal or proposition formally made," from Old French mocion "movement, motion; change, alteration" (13c., Modern French motion) and directly from Latin motionem (nominative motio) "a moving, a motion; an emotion," from past-participle stem of movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

From c. 1400 in legal sense of "application to a court or judge." To be in motion "in a state of motion" is from c. 1600; to set in motion "set working" is from 1590s. To go through the motions in the figurative sense of "pretend, do in a perfunctory manner" is by 1816 from the notion of "simulate the motions of." Motion picture is attested from 1896; motion sickness by 1942.

Rev. G.S. White said : The Presbytery does not favour the proposition of the Richmond Convention, and thinks the appointment of the Committee unnecessary; yet I suppose, that like the man who had nothing to eat, yet always spread the table, and sat down, and went through the motions—so we, according to our brother, are in honour bound, to appoint the Committee and go through the motions!—[Laughter] [The Presbyterian Magazine, May, 1858]

motion (v.)

late 15c., "to request, petition" (obsolete), from motion (n.). The sense in parliamentary procedure, "to propose, move" is by 1747; with meaning "to guide or direct by a significant sign, gesture, or movement," as with the hand or head, it is attested from 1787. Related: Motioned; motioning.

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Definitions of motion
1
motion (n.)
the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals;
Synonyms: gesture
motion (n.)
a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something;
Synonyms: movement
motion (n.)
a change of position that does not entail a change of location;
the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise
Synonyms: movement / move / motility
motion (n.)
a state of change;
they were in a state of steady motion
motion (n.)
a formal proposal for action made to a deliberative assembly for discussion and vote;
he made a motion to adjourn
Synonyms: question
motion (n.)
the act of changing location from one place to another;
police controlled the motion of the crowd
Synonyms: movement / move
motion (n.)
an optical illusion of motion produced by viewing a rapid succession of still pictures of a moving object;
the cinema relies on apparent motion
Synonyms: apparent motion / apparent movement / movement
2
motion (v.)
show, express or direct through movement;
Synonyms: gesticulate / gesture
From wordnet.princeton.edu