Etymology
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Words related to mile

banlieue (n.)
French word for "suburbs, outskirts, outlying precincts of a town or city," 13c., from Vulgar Latin *banleuca, from Germanic *ban (see ban (n.1)) + leuca "a league" (of distance, in Medieval Latin, "indefinite extent of territory;" see league (n.2)). So, originally, "area around a town within which the bans -- rules and proclamations of that place -- were in force; territory outside the walls but within the legal jurisdiction." German had a similar formation, bann-meile (see mile (n.)), in the same sense; and compare Middle English bane cruces "crosses marking the boundary of territory subject to the edicts or laws of a certain ruler."
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mileage (n.)

formerly also milage, 1754, "allowance or compensation for travel or conveyance reckoned by the mile," originally in reference to American political representatives, from mile + -age. From 1837 as "fixed rate per mile," originally for use of railroad cars. Meaning "a total number of miles" (of a way made, used, or traversed) is from 1861; the figurative use in this sense, "usefulness, derived benefit" is by 1860. Of a motor vehicle, "miles driven per gallon of gasoline," by 1912.

milepost (n.)

also mile-post, "post set up to mark the distance by miles along a highway, etc.," 1768, from mile + post (n.1).

milestone (n.)

also mile-stone, "stone or pillar set up on a highway or other line of travel to mark the distance in miles," 1746, from mile + stone (n.).

milliary (adj.)

"pertaining to the ancient Roman mile," 1640s, from Latin milliarius, from mille (see mile (n.)). As a noun, "a milestone," c. 1600, from Latin milliarium.