Etymology
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medlar (n.)

small fruit-bearing tree related to the crab-apple, c. 1400 (mid-14c. in reference to the fruit itself, earlier medle, c. 1300), from Old French medler, meslier, variants of mesple, from Latin mespila "fruit of the medlar," from Greek mespilion, a foreign word of unknown origin (Beekes thinks it probably Pre-Greek on account of the suffix).

"When first gathered, it is harsh and uneatable, but in the early stages of decay it acquires an acid flavor much relished by some" [Century Dictionary]. The tree was introduced into southern Europe from western Asia. In Romanic the initial consonant has shifted to n-; as in French nèfle, Spanish nespera, Italian nespolo (see napkin). The Old English name for the fruit was openærs, literally "open-arse," probably so called for the large puckered "eye" between the calyx lobes.

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Definitions of medlar

medlar (n.)
small deciduous tree of southern Africa having edible fruit;
Synonyms: wild medlar / wild medlar tree / Vangueria infausta
medlar (n.)
small deciduous Eurasian tree cultivated for its fruit that resemble crab apples;
Synonyms: medlar tree / Mespilus germanica
medlar (n.)
a South African globular fruit with brown leathery skin and pithy flesh having a sweet-acid taste;
medlar (n.)
crabapple-like fruit used for preserves;
From wordnet.princeton.edu