Etymology
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mandarin (n.)

1580s, "Chinese official," via Portuguese mandarim or older Dutch mandorijn from Malay (Austronesian) mantri, from Hindi mantri "councilor, minister of state," from Sanskrit mantri, nominative of mantrin- "adviser," from mantra "counsel," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." Form influenced in Portuguese by mandar "to command, order."

Used generically for the several grades of Chinese officials; the Chinese equivalent is kwan "public servant." Sense of "chief dialect of Chinese" (spoken by officials and educated people and generally in the northern, central, and western provinces and Manchuria) is from c. 1600. Transferred sense of "important person" attested by 1907. The type of small, deep-colored orange so called from 1771, from resemblance of its color to that of robes worn by mandarins.

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Definitions of mandarin
1
mandarin (n.)
shrub or small tree having flattened globose fruit with very sweet aromatic pulp and thin yellow-orange to flame-orange rind that is loose and easily removed; native to southeastern Asia;
Synonyms: mandarin orange / mandarin orange tree / Citrus reticulata
mandarin (n.)
a member of an elite intellectual or cultural group;
mandarin (n.)
any high government official or bureaucrat;
mandarin (n.)
a high public official of imperial China;
mandarin (n.)
a somewhat flat reddish-orange loose skinned citrus of China;
Synonyms: mandarin orange
2
Mandarin (n.)
the dialect of Chinese spoken in Beijing and adopted as the official language for all of China;
Synonyms: Mandarin Chinese / Mandarin dialect / Beijing dialect
From wordnet.princeton.edu